In this photo taken on Sept. 23, 2010, a girl sits in front of rows of tents at a camp run by the Pakistan Army for people displaced by floods in Sukkur, southern Pakistan. // Pakistan (CP images)

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In this photo taken on Sept. 23, 2010, a girl sits in front of rows of tents at a camp run by the Pakistan Army for people displaced by floods in Sukkur, southern Pakistan.

For the 133,000 Pakistani immigrants living in Canada, the closest they'll get to their homeland for the time being is through a TV or computer screen. The country continues to reel after the worst flooding in Pakistan's history killed more than 1,500 people and affected a staggering 20 million people last year. United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called it the worst disaster he's ever seen. The security situation also remains fragile and unpredictable, with terrorist attacks, suicide bombings and political assassinations continuing to throw the country into anarchy. Following the coordinated terrorist attacks in Mumbai in 2008, in which Pakistani gunmen stormed the city killing 166 people, tensions between Pakistan and India continue to be high.

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